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-wage china when he was on the board of gateway computer. he wants to turn michigan into the same low wage environment we see in china. >> reporter: looking around here live at the scene at the capitol, you have teachers who took the day off from school to demonstrate. you have united auto workers. we saw several big trucks from the teamsters. a lot of people sympathetic to efforts of these workers out here making their voices heard, expressing their discontent with what has happened. governor snyder told me a short time ago this is in response to a ballot initiative you remember failed in november. that was proposition 2. it would have put collective bargaining in the michigan constitution. it would have made it untouchable by any kind of new legislation. that is part of the complaint from the democrats. they say it is politics and retribution. also the complaint you hear from democrats it happened so fast. it happened without the public having time for input. what you see on the lawn is something governor snyder referenced f there wasn't enough time for public input you wouldn't have all
worked until 66, but i was forced into retirement after my company said most of the job to china. all you have to do is look around and see owns all the gas stations and 7-eleven's. those people are the rich ones that come from their countries and turnaround and bring their servants with them. that is who is running those businesses. host: what do you think needs to happen in the next couple days before the end of the year? caller: one has to happen if the republicans have to agree on bringing the jobs back from overseas. the democrats could maybe agree on cutting back on some of these food stamps, especially for people that have come here and have never worked for the country and don't deserve it. host: on twitter -- another story this morning, this from "usa today." we are still getting your thoughts for the next five or 10 minutes in this first segment of the washington journal on john boehner's "plan b" that was released yesterday in case the negotiations break down over the fiscal cliff. william from north carolina is on our independent line. caller: i was calling to tell you that th
. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had this number last week. reminds people, again, they've been right down, and up. mcdonald's is one of those things where joe asked me from squawk when we were talking, i said, i think this is a for real term. if they continue to innovate. i may this may not be your cup of tea, burger, but innovation s higher. >> they tried to sell it to consumers as opposed to their extra value menu, which is a little bit hi
a satellite into orbit. its neighbors are unnerved. even china expressed regret at the move. the obama administration condemned it as a provocative act and will likely ask the u.n. security council to impose crippling sanctions. the pentagon following developments this morning. chris lawrence there. what do you know, chris? >> right now, officials say that object that north korea put into orbit, monitoring it, analyzing it, but they confirm it is in orbit. why is that important? the same technology you would use to put into orbit is the same technology you use to develop long-range ballistic missiles, the u.s. condemned this act. they are worried about the marriage of north korea's nuclear weapons with this long-range missile technology. this is the type of missile that if it was successful, as it appears to be, could reach parts of the united states, alaska, u.s. military bases in hawaii. but a u.s. efficiently i spoke with who used to work on north north korea for the defense department told me, there are still areas in which north korea has not made it as far as they would need to i
it anymore. he wasn't satisfied with outsourcing thousands of jobs to low wage china when he was on the board of gateway computer. he wants to turn michigan into the same low-wage environment we see in china. >> reporter: as you look at state troopers out here right now, some are equipped with batons. look at their hips. what they have on their hips there are gas masks. you can see some weapons they're carrying. nonlethal weapons that would be used to dispurse the tear gas if it was needed to. as we bring up we heard someone shouting in the background it has been a peaceful demonstration. it has. there was trouble on the first day. eight people were arrested. a little bit of tear gas went out. here in this demonstration, things have been peaceful. nothing more than a lot of people showing up in numbers expressing discontent with the legislature and the speed with this legislation and speed which it moved through the legislature, jenna, mike, we saw a sign behind you. it said there is war on workers in the state of michigan. what is the primary gripe of unions and their members? >> reporter: w
deal, it will be one of the largest ever by chinese investors. china's state owned oil giant c-nook swooped in to acquire nexen for a cool $15 billion. note to the obama administration, it is not happening in a bubble. last year you'll recall the obama administration put off a decision on the excel pipeline, an extension of a pipeline that would connect the oil in alberta to the gulf of mexico and international markets. the democrats killed it because of concerns from environmentalists. the proposed route crossed the aquifer in nebraska and white house and state department officials could have just insisted on rerouting the pipe, but they didn't. a bad move, one that was highly thought to play to the president's base. now that the elections are over, a review of a new route will begin sometime next year. the leakages of that pipe were a minor concern, though it got all the headlines. a more legitimate environmental concern is carbon emissions. processing crude that is mined from the oil sands emits double the emissions of regular drilled oil. but oil sands still -- that still s
to have in the euro zone and the energy needs in china and india and industrialized nations. what do you think is the biggest threat from the outside to the u.s. economy? >> the fiscal cliff. first of all i think there are issues that are beginning to improve and, you know, whether you look at the euro zone which is making progress, gradually, laboriously and certainly improving and with good numbers because if you look at thinge ia because if you look at thinge a greg gat euro zone debt, and you have political stability back now that the new team is in place so the volatility and the instability factors that are outside have reduced. the real threat that we have at the moment is really here with us and that can be addressed. >> but when you look at, i mean i understood that the european banks had sort of downsized or downgraded what they thought would be growth. you've got more than 11% unemployment in the euro zone, which is a good deal higher than here. >> yeah yeah. >> are those things threats to the u.s. economy or do you think the u.s. economy now is destabilizing or has the poten
to america at 14, 15, $16 an hour. we don't celebrate that. i'm glad they're here instead of china, but heck. if we had an economy that would support $30-an-hour jobs, i'd be for that. better than a ceo. you know, destroying a company and then getting a $200 million payout. but that said, what is wrong with a state allowing an american to work where he or she wants to work without having to be compelled to pay union dues? >> well, this state, michigan, was such a part of the core of unionism in this country, the foundation of the united automobile workers which at one point had over 1 million workers in its enrollment is now down to roughly maybe 350,000 workers. the united automobile workers, everybody can own a car in america. the history of unionism has been inextricably linked to the growth of the middle class, as you know, over the last 60 years of american history. the right-to-work legislation that has passed now in 24 states, i don't think you can dem demonstrably prove that it leads to higher wages, that it leads to marginally -- >> but what's wrong with giving people the freedom to
of lives, syria's only friends in the world have been naturally iran and china but also their best friends, russia. russia. and that was true until today. russia today did not formally declare that they're no longer going to support the syrian government against the rebels, but for the first time a high-ranking russian official said publicly that yeah, it looks like assad is going to lose this war. i mean, the united states has been saying that forever. nato has been saying that forever. everybody who wants assad to go has been saying that forever. you try to create an air of inevitability about the thing you want to happen. right? that makes sense. but now for the other side to be saying it, for syria's best friend to be saying yeah, syria, you're going to lose this, it's going to happen, that is a huge, huge deal. it is sometimes hard to follow the day-to-day news out of this war, to know what is an important day and what is just another awful day. but this is a really important moment. because syria was sort of down to their last friend in the world. and if they are now down to not even
was union and we were making $16 an hour. it went overseas. the company would prefer to go to china and a somebody $2 a day or whatever. these right-to-work states are full of temporary jobs agencies with contracts. the stamp services -- these temporary services are making money and paying people a fraction. we need to let politicians go to a temporary service and give them half of what they are making and make them see how we feel. people working for small amounts of money at temp services. ynette.ow to panetta, conwalive caller: they call it a right-to- work states, but i guess the language got changed, because it used to be a free will state. the employers without unions had the right to fire you for anything, any reason or no reason at all, and you had no recourse. so i still believe in unions and i still believe the people should have a right to join or not. host: this tweet -- are you with us? caller: i am. host: higher wages of less jobs in the state's. caller: yes, but most of the jobs in this area, in the myrtle beach area, those are minimum- wage jobs, where i live. if we
. think about countries like china and germany. they're continuing to expand their wind industries in the renewable energy sectors. if we don't support our wind energy industry here and the wind manufacturing facilities we're effectively offshoring and exporting those jobs. our global competitors aren't hesitating. they're encouraging wind power development. and they know the longer we fail to act, literally the more wind they can steal from our sails. so enough is enough. this is an american industry. it needs to continue to be an american industry. but we risk everything, literally everything if we let the p.t.c. lapse in 18 days. so let's focus on this made in america potential. through it we can obtain energy independence. we can ensure energy security and we keep jobs in new mexico and colorado, minnesota, new york, every state in our great country. so let's not wait any longer. let's continue to build this clean energy economy right here in the united states. mr. president, let's do it today. the p.t.c. equals jobs. let's pass it as soon as possible. thank you, mr. president.
. they would just use other weapons, like they have in china, where they go in the classrooms and used swords and knives and start killing people? . that would probably be a bad idea too. so i think it's just education and trying to curb things that might influence people from doing such. host: what are some suggestions for that, jason? caller: it's hard to say, because a variety of people get into a variety of situations. whatever it is causes them to do things like that. better time spent talking to your kids, more money spent on mental health, things of that nature, i would say. otherwise, you are just point to end up with these situations occurring again. host: here's a story from cnn's talking about this recent attack where a man wielding a knife entered a school. injured 22 children and adults was also wounded. some of those kids are in critical condition. no deaths. does that make a difference to you? caller: certainly. i really don't know what you can do in a situation like that. if you look at gun-control laws such as in phoenix, arizona, where they have certain laws, it has not gone
/11 and in syria and china with the 22 children who were disfigured and cut within less than a week. and then in syria, the 47 people that have been killed by snipers and the thousands that have been killed that our children and women. you can see them on youtube right now. i want to understand why you diminished someones comment with the purpose. rather than being critical, the reality is a horrible situation that happened. i do not defend anything that happened at the school, but the individual data has a $100 shotgun or less -- and individual with a $100 shotgun or less, the situation would have been worse. in 1994 when you lost the assault weapons ban, you also lost the house for tenure. i will stop -- for 10 years. i will invite the listeners to look at the china situation a week ago where years and figures were cut off. guest: as you know, we do live in a society where we do feel protected and represented in government i think that is something that is diminished and there is a sense of government for us. and but we do have a representative democracy and it is something that w
making $1 in mexico in factories. later burma and later china. so suddenly they have a narrative saying mooirn autoworkers make more money than people in mexico and china. those workers have no rights. ordinary citizens in those countries have no rights to change their traditions and now we have ap narrative saying american autoworkers make too mitch but they don't. and point two was to undo labor law. regan came in 1981 and regan, as we famously know. >> let me stop you there on that nearive. undoing the labor lay starts much earlier. >> absolutely. >> i'm just trying to -- >> i know, but the 47 is when it really starts. to say what happens in '47. in some ways '47 -- the opening thing in this batting is really '47. >> i'll start at 35. no one understands how this works. >> hear that america. none of you understand this. >> gun safety and restoring american workers from a middle class standard it's all on a continuum. 1935, the national relation's act is passed. the mlra. by 1947, the taft hartley act is passed and that begins a systematic rollback of labor law in this country but it t
china because the dollar will not be worth. that is what is it is a bout. host: on the front page of "the financial times." we also have a tweet. this is what the senate minority leader said yesterday on the floor after his meeting at the white house. [video clip] >> i share the view of the majority leader. we had a good meeting at the white house. we are engaged in discussions, the majority leader and myself a in the hopes that we can come forward as early as sunday and have a recommendation that i can make to my conference and the majority leader can make to his conference. we will be working hard to try to see if we can get there in the next 24 hours. i am hopeful and optimistic. >> we are talking about the senate negotiating a fiscal could deal on -- but one of the stories of in the paper comes from the baltimore sun with the president of in there headline saying the president modestly optimistic. let's see what the thoughts are of the viewers and listeners this morning. pamela from new jersey on the line for democrats. are you optimistic about the fiscal clefts deal? caller:
, china and india in particular are actually the source of most of the increasing greenhouse fasts that we've seen in recent years and the united states is at a level of greenhouse gas emissions it hasn't been at in over a decade. so, partially due to our own repressed economy, but partialingly due to the fact that you're talking about regulations and alternative fuels, the u.s. economy and other industriallized economies have actually seen their emissions stabilize or even fall over the past decade. >> yeah, and china, they're a big polluter. i mean, if you go into a store and you break something, you pay for it. so, if we can prove that a country is a big polluter, why shouldn't they pay? >> the problem is that even if the united states, all the other stilllized countries complied with what the secretary-general was talking about, it actually wouldn't do anything in terms of greenhouse gas emissions because the growth in the greenhouse gas emissions is coming with the developing world and it would be almost symbolic gesture in terms of global warming which is their theory and do nothing
taxpayers' dollars, the steel came from china. what are we doing to america and what are we doing to our manufacturing? i think we need a wake-up call. we're busy holding up the entire congress, protecting tax breaks for billionaires. when are we going to start looking out for american jobs? when we're talking about this fiscal cliff, we're not talking about having a jobs component in it. when are we going to start talking about tax breaks so we can have an infrastructure bank, so we can rebuild america using american products. and why is it when they say you want it made in america, they call us protectionist. well, i welcome the call of protection. i want to protect american jobs. i don't want them on a slow boat to china or a fast track to mexico. i might not ever get my steel mill back. baltimore might not ever have those jobs back but, you know, we've got to get serious in our country, what are our priorities. we have to start rewarding those industries that make products in this country. right now our whole code is oriented to protecting people who make money off of money. well, le
with the challenges in europe, with china going through a transition, with india's political system, as chair of the india caucus, almost more this functional than ours. we look pretty darn good if we can put a real plan in place. >> what would be the size of the plan? >> i think it gets north of $4 trillion, whether it gets to $6 trillion. this goes back to where you start. two points -- kind of on the opening round questions. it is important to remember that the simpson-bowles plan, which has gained a lot of attention, or the gang of six, which is built off the simpson- bowles, the presumptions that went into those plans assumed that all the top rates would go back up. when you start from that, even though i think simpson-bowles's idea that he would bring the rates down to the high 20's is a bit of a stretch. i do not think we will see that kind of across the board almost zeroing out in some places of tax expenditures that would require. they can show a path towards meaningful tax reform even with the rates at the higher level. point two, and this is one of the things where i think those of
smaller than those of countries like china. and in turn today -- 8 report was done on comparative tax, and they support 20% of their federal government through import taxes. why is it that we feel we cannot compete with a country that is taxing us heavily on our imports, yet when they export to our country we have just 1.9% next that is ridiculous. it is not a level playing field -- 1.9%? that is ridiculous. that is not a level playing field. an in tern in indiana did this research. guest: there is the risk of a trade war, a violation of the world trade organization pact. a lot of the big box stores rely on inexpensive imports. so it would be a trade-off. it would have an impact on the prices. host: winchester, ohio. thomas is an independent. caller: thanks for taking my call. i watch c-span all the time. i'm curious why this continuation of the republican versus democrat bashing goes on when there is such an important issue that needs to be taken care of in this country. why is there not a federal sales tax to take care of some of this debt that we have increased needlessly, in many
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)